ERASMUS

2020/21/1

Legal Theory 2

Fall 2020

Teacher: Szilárd Tattay
Email: tattay.szilard@jak.ppke.hu

Course description
The course 'Legal Theory 2' treats the fundamental elements and problems of legal philosophy within a unified conceptual framework. Above all, it discusses the essence of law and its relation to justice, legal validity, the distinction between binding force, coercive force and violence, and the relationship and differences between law and morality. The emphasis is placed on grounding fundamental human rights and natural law institutions. The notion of legal argumentation, its possibilities and limits of application are also expounded within this theoretical framework. In this way, legal philosophy recovers its traditional, jusnaturalistic meaning and content, and thereby essential legal concepts, questions and institutions almost completely abandoned by contemporary legal theory regain their importance.

Requirements and evaluation
Attendance and active class participation are basic requirements. Evaluation will be based partly on oral examination and partly on class participation.

Readings
Hans Kelsen, Introduction to the Problems of Legal Theory [1934], trans. B. L. Paulson and S. L. Paulson (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992), §§ 1–17, pp. 7–36
Herbert Hart, The Concept of Law [1961] (Oxford: OUP, 1994), ch. V & ch. VI, sec. 1, pp. 79–110
Gustav Radbruch, 'Five Minutes of Legal Philosophy' [1945], trans. B. L. Paulson and S. L. Paulson, Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 26 (2006), pp. 13–15
Gustav Radbruch 'Statutory Lawlessness and Supra-Statutory Law' [1946], trans. B. L. Paulson and S. L. Paulson, Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 26 (2006), pp. 1–11
Jacques Maritain, Man and the State [1951] (Washington: Catholic University of America Press, 1998), ch. IV, pp. 76–107
Lon L. Fuller, The Morality of Law, rev. ed. (New Haven & London: Yale UP, 1969), ch. II, pp. 33–44
John Finnis, Natural Law and Natural Rights (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1980), ch. II, pp. 23–55
Jerome Frank, Law and the Modern Mind [1930] (New York: Anchor Books 1963), ch. I, pp. 3–13
Karl Olivecrona 'Realism and Idealism: Some Reflections on the Cardinal Point in Legal Philosophy' NYU Law Review 26 (1951), pp. 120–131
Alf Ross, 'Tû-tû', Harvard Law Review 70 (1957), pp. 812–825

2019/20/2
Legal Theory 1

Instructor: Dr Szilárd Tattay
Office hours: Tuesday 11:30–12:00 and 13:30-14:30, Wednesday 11:30–12:00; Room 228
Email: tattay.szilard@jak.ppke.hu

Course description
The course provides an introduction to the history of legal thought through the presentation of its main thinkers and questions. The course will follow a seminar format where we will read, discuss and interpret classical texts in legal philosophy from antiquity to the 19th century.

Requirements and evaluation
Attendance, prior reading and active class participation are basic requirements. Four absences will result in your failing the course. Evaluation will be based partly on oral examination and partly on class participation.

Detailed Contents and Readings
Ancient Legal Thought
Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics Book 5, Chapters 1-2, 6-7 and 10
Aristotle, On Rhetoric Book 1, Chapters 13 and 15
The Digest of Justinian Book 1, Title 1
Marcus Tullius Cicero, On the Laws Book 1, Sections 15-63
Medieval Doctrines of Natural Law
St. Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologiae IIa IIae Question 57 Articles 1-2, Ia IIae Question 90 Articles 1-2, Question 91 Articles 1-4 and Question 94 Articles 2 and 4-5
William of Ockham, A Dialogue Part 3, Tract 2, Book 3, Chapter 6
William of Ockham, The Work of Ninety Days Chapter 65
Legal Philosophy of the Renaissance
Hugo Grotius, The Rights of War and Peace Preliminary Discourse, Sections 1-12 and Book 1, Chapter 1, Sections 1-15
Social Contract Theory and the Enlightenment
Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan Chapters 13-14
John Locke, Two Treatises of Government Book 2, Chapter 9
Charles-Louis de Montesquieu, The Spirit of Laws Book 1 and Book 11, Chapters 1-6
Legal Positivism and Historical School of Law
John Austin, The Province of Jurisprudence Determined Lecture 1
Friedrich Carl von Savigny, Of the Vocation of Our Age for Legislation and Jurisprudence Chapters 2-3

 

2019/20/1

Legal Theory 2

Fall 2019

Instructor: Szilárd Tattay
Email: tattay.szilard@jak.ppke.hu
Office hours: Monday 12:30–14:00 and Tuesday 14:30–15:00, Building A, Room 228

Course description
The course 'Legal Theory 2' treats the fundamental elements and problems of legal philosophy within a unified conceptual framework. Above all, it discusses the essence of law and its relation to justice, legal validity, the distinction between binding force, coercive force and violence, and the relationship and differences between law and morality. The emphasis is placed on grounding fundamental human rights and natural law institutions. The notion of legal argumentation, its possibilities and limits of application are also expounded within this theoretical framework. In this way, legal philosophy recovers its traditional, jusnaturalistic meaning and content, and thereby essential legal concepts, questions and institutions almost completely abandoned by contemporary legal theory regain their importance.

Requirements and evaluation
Attendance and active class participation are basic requirements. Four absences will result in your failing the course. Evaluation will be based partly on oral examination and partly on class participation.

Readings
Hans Kelsen, Introduction to the Problems of Legal Theory [1934], trans. B. L. Paulson and S. L. Paulson (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992), §§ 1–17, pp. 7–36
Herbert Hart, The Concept of Law [1961] (Oxford: OUP, 1994), ch. V & ch. VI, sec. 1, pp. 79–110
Gustav Radbruch, 'Five Minutes of Legal Philosophy' [1945], trans. B. L. Paulson and S. L. Paulson, Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 26 (2006), pp. 13–15
Gustav Radbruch 'Statutory Lawlessness and Supra-Statutory Law' [1946], trans. B. L. Paulson and S. L. Paulson, Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 26 (2006), pp. 1–11
Jacques Maritain, Man and the State [1951] (Washington: Catholic University of America Press, 1998), ch. IV, pp. 76–107
Lon L. Fuller, The Morality of Law, rev. ed. (New Haven & London: Yale UP, 1969), ch. II, pp. 33–44
John Finnis, Natural Law and Natural Rights (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1980), ch. II, pp. 23–55
Jerome Frank, Law and the Modern Mind [1930] (New York: Anchor Books 1963), ch. I, pp. 3–13
Karl Olivecrona 'Realism and Idealism: Some Reflections on the Cardinal Point in Legal Philosophy' NYU Law Review 26 (1951), pp. 120–131
Alf Ross, 'Tû-tû', Harvard Law Review 70 (1957), pp. 812–825

 

2014/15/2

 

LAW AND LITERATURE

Lecturer: dr. István H. Szilágyi

Topics

1. Law and Literature – a thematic survey

2. The art of interpretation. Case study I. Antigone

3. Case study II. The Merchant of Venice

4. Case study III. The Trial

5. The narration and the problem of critical potential. Case study IV. 1984

6. Case study V. The Chronicle of a Death Foretold

7. Case study VI.  A Time to Kill

8. Case study VIII. The Gulag Archipelago

9. Struggle for the language

10. The art of law

Literature:

James Boyd White, Heracles' Bow, Essays on the Rhetoric and Poetics of the Law (Madison, Wisconsin, The University of Wisconsin Press 1985).

Richard Posner, Law and Literature, A Misunderstood Relationship (Cambridge: Harvard University Press 1988).

Maria Aristodemou, Law and Literature, Journeys from Her to Eternity (Oxford: Oxford University Press 2000).

Requirements: for the fulfilling of the course it is obligatory to write a minimum 4.000 words long essay on Gabriel García Márquez's novel, The Chronicle of a Death Foretold.

 

Theory of the State

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